Immigration Legal Assistant Certificate (Live Online and In-Class)

  • Format:

    Live Online 

    Note: If you enroll by June 30, you will qualify for a $500 summer term rebate on tuition.

  • Duration:

    320 hours

  • Application fee:

    $40 (Domestic)
    $140 (International)

  • Tuition Fee:

    $5,200 (Domestic)
    $6,500 (International)

     

 

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Start Date

Term : Summer

Live Online live-logo

Full Time: July 11, 2022 – November 04, 2022

 

In-Class

Full Time: September 12, 2022 – January 07, 2023

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Program Overview


Immigration Legal Assistants help Immigration Practitioners execute their duties and expedite cases by handling documentation, communications and other responsibilities. Working with potential Canadian immigrants provides a fulfilling career with many opportunities for advancement.

The ILAC program serves as an excellent introduction for those who are new to the field. The program develops your knowledge and understanding of the Canadian Immigration system, policies and procedures. Individuals who are foreign-trained lawyers or who have legal experience outside of Canada can use this program to gain employment in the Canadian Immigration Law sector. Current Legal Assistants and Paralegals can also use this program to advance their careers with a specialization in Immigration.

Immigration is a growing sector in Canada with ever-increasing opportunities for professionals looking to enter the field. Graduates will be able to pursue jobs in immigration consulting firms, immigration law offices, government offices, recruitment agencies, and immigration settlement organizations, or they can continue their studies in the immigration and legal fields.

Please note that this program DOES NOT qualify graduates to practice as Regulated immigration Consultants or Lawyers.

Topics Covered/Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this certificate program, successful students will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Provide an overview of the various decision makers involved in the implementation of the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and Regulations and the Canadian Citizenship Act and Regulations
  • Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to the practical requirements for submissions of applications concerning the guides, document checklists, application forms, and supporting documentation concerning Canada’s immigration system
  • Apply the knowledge and skills required to assist with a professional, effective, and efficient immigration practice
  • Exercise the rules of professional conduct, demonstrating the attitudes, values and ethical standards required to assist with services in an immigration consultant office or law firm
  • Communicate effectively with clients and individuals within the legal system
  • Apply strategies to improve knowledge and skills through continuing education in this field

Career Opportunities

Immigration legal assistants are heavily involved in the administrative aspects of an immigration law practice. This program teaches students how to perform all the duties of an immigration legal assistant, which include:

  • Legal Assistant in an immigration consulting office or law firm
  • Legal Administrative Assistant
  • Office Administrative Assistant
  • Immigration Processing Assistant
  • Clerical Assistant
  • Immigration Application Assistant

Career Advancement Opportunities

Newcomers to immigration law will be able to enter the field immediately after graduating and start gaining experience working in immigration consulting firms, immigration law offices, corporate offices, recruitment agency offices and government offices, where they will assist and work under the supervision of a licenced immigration practitioner or as part of a legal team.

In 2021, Canada welcomed the most immigrants in a single year, reaching its goal of 401,000 permanent residents. The majority of the new permanent residents were individuals already in Canada on a temporary status. To help with these individuals, Canada launched new programs to engage essential workers, health care professionals, international graduates and French-speaking newcomers. Immigration Practitioners, along with their team of immigration legal assistants, worked extremely hard this year to reach this goal processing more than half a million applications. Immigration Level Plans are even higher for the next two years with targets of over 411,000 new permanent residents in 2022 and 421,000 new permanent residents in 2023.  As we saw in 2021 the number of applications will far exceed that target, meaning the number of opportunities for immigration legal assistants will continue to grow for the foreseeable future.

 

 

Course Descriptions

ILAC 01: Working in a Legal Environment (30 hours)

Brief Course Description

This course provides an overview of working in a legal environment. Students will get a clear understanding of their role as an Immigration Legal Assistant within an Immigration Lawyer and/or Canadian Immigration and Citizenship Consultants’  practice. Students will get an introductory look at how to conduct oneself professionally in a legal office and within legal settings.

This course outlines the Canadian Justice System, time management and file management, and the role of the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants.  Students will differentiate between the various documents needed to support clients through legal proceedings. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Explain the structure of legal environments and understand the various roles and responsibilities of those working within a legal office. 
  2. Outline the need for integral, professional and ethical behaviour when working in a legal setting. 
  3. Explain and outline the Canadian Justice System and the role of the Law Societies and College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants.
  4. Explain the importance of time management when working in a legal environment. Identify best practices in organization, scheduling and efficiency as they pertain to the legal workspace. 
  5. Explore file management systems and identify potential problems that could arise. Identify best practices in file management, as well as technology used to manage files within legal offices. 
  6. Outline all the documentation required when handling a new client (ID, verification, conflict of interest, client information sheets and client consent forms) and the steps required in opening and closing a client file.
  7. Differentiate the professional and ethical responsibilities of an Immigration Legal Assistant and a Regulated Canadian Immigration and Citizenship Consultant or a Regulated International Student Immigration Advisor.
  8. Identify the differences between a retainer and an agreement.
  9. Understand and be able to utilize general file management and client file management procedures that are in accordance with a Law Society’s rules and the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants’ file management regulations.
  10. Understand client accounts and their parameters that are in accordance with Law Society’s rules and the College of Immigration and Citizenship Consultants’ client account regulations.

ILAC 02: Legal Accounting (30 hours)

Brief Course Description

This course will provide an introductory look at legal accounting principles. Students will become familiar with accounting terminology and get a chance to apply their understanding through the production of accounting documents. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the obligations for documenting financial activity within a law society. Identify accounting principles and standards for private businesses such as a legal office.
  2. Define basic accounting terminology such as: assets, liability, equity, income expenses, balance sheets, chart of accounts. Categorize the different account types.
  3. Explain basic accounting concepts such as: the fiscal year, the accounting cycle, debits & credits and the general journal.
  4. Demonstrate posting transactions from the general journal to the general ledger, as well as produce a trial balance.
  5. Interpret information from accounting documents such as income statements, statement of owner’s equity and balance sheets.
  6. Demonstrate use of the special journals but recording fees, receipts and disbursements special journals.
  7. Differentiate between general accounts and trust accounts and explain the requirements and nuances of trust accounting.
  8. Explain the process of adjusting accounts for financial statements.
  9. Identify the final steps taken when closing the accounting cycle; posting entries and closing trial balances.
  10. Identify the need for a petty cash fund and how to reconcile petty cash in the various accounts at month-end.
  11. Calculate GST/HST and describe the reporting process to the CRA. Identify payroll deductions and other income tax considerations.
  12. Apply basic accounting principles in an electronic accounting software.

ILAC 03: Legal Research and Informatics (30 hours)

Brief Course Description

This course develops research skills and the understanding of these skills within the context of immigration law. Students will gain access to a variety of relevant websites in order to generate a submission letter and make Access to Information requests.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the purpose for legal research and the steps for conducting legal research, as well as the different categories and sources of law.
  2. Explore the sources of Canadian law; statues, regulations, by-laws and case law.
  3. Identify the need for analyzing a fact situation.
  4. Identify where to access different sources (print and online) to aid in the research process.
  5. Locate general statements of law using a legal encyclopedia.
  6. Use finding tools to access current statutes and regulations.
  7. Apply their understanding of legal research by going through the stages of resolving a research problem.
  8. Generate a submission letter and make an Access to Information Request.

ILAC 04: Communications for Legal Professionals (30 hours)

Brief Course Description

This course will provide an overview of all writing and communication forms found within a legal setting. Students will look at all communications and correspondences and get a chance to draft and edit. Students will understand how grammar, spelling and writing style can impact the tone of a document. Using appropriate legal terminology and effectively communicating is a vital responsibility in a role in the legal field. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Outline the need for strong communication within a legal field, amongst colleagues, clients and individuals from diverse backgrounds and/or needs. Explain the barriers to strong communication and the nuances of team communication.
  2. Apply a basic understanding of processing correspondence and legal documents (I.e. affidavits, statutory declarations, notarial certificates, undertakings and authorizations).
  3. Use legal terminology and appropriate sources of legal research.
  4. Identify common spelling and grammatical errors and use proper legal terminology.
  5. Identify the appropriate writing style needed when completing legal paperwork (I.e., abbreviations, acronyms, legal expressions, summarizing and tone).
  6. Differentiate between summarizing and paraphrasing.
  7. Identify the uses for different written letters in a legal setting and demonstrate the ability to properly format a written letter through drafting and editing.
  8. Identify the uses for memorandum within a legal setting and demonstrate the ability to produce effective memorandum, including correct legal citations.
  9. Explain appropriate email and social media etiquette as it pertains to legal offices. Deal with communication and legal correspondence templates and email guidelines.
  10. Prepare and process legal documents using correct spelling and grammar and differentiate between the different legal documents.
  11. Develop their skills in speaking and listening.

ILAC 05: Immigration Fundamentals and Ethics (30 hours)

Brief Course Description

This course provides an introductory look at the fundamentals of immigration, refugee, and citizenship law, as well as admissibility. This course explores the various parties involved in immigration and citizenship. Students will get a chance to decipher the nuances of admissibility in Canada.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explore the history of immigration law and the sources of immigration, refugee, and citizenship law.
  2. Identify the roles of the Immigration and Refugee Board, Federal Court, Supreme Court of Canada and Federal Immigration Agencies.
  3. Understand Authorized Representatives and the role of Immigration Legal Assistants.
  4. Explore the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act and Regulations and the Citizenship Act and Regulations.
  5. Discuss the administration of immigration, refugee, and citizenship programs including the Ministers’authority; managing immigration, refugee, and citizenship programs; and the Courts- Federal Court, Federal Court of Appeal, and Supreme Court of Canada.
  6. Assessing Inadmissibilityand General Application Requirements.
  7. Identifying and understanding the various Grounds of Inadmissibility.

ILAC 06: Temporary Immigration Programs (30 hours)

Brief Course Description

This course will provide a look at temporary immigration programs with the generic requirements of what comprises a temporary application. Students will learn how to complete and submit (via online portals, email and paper) guides, document checklists, applications, fees and supporting documents.This course will deal specifically with temporary resident visas, visitor records, study permits and work permits (both online and through Visa Access Centres). During this course students will also look at extensions of status and visa issuance within Canada (Case Processing Centres and International Mobility Centres). Being that this course considers temporary work permits, students will also get a chance to explore the Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIAs) through Service Canada Centres and Employer Compliance requirements.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the different classes of temporary residents (visitor, student, worker and permit holder) and their individual requirements.
  2. Outline the steps (and demonstrate the ability to complete application forms) for obtaining a temporary resident visa and a temporary resident permit and differentiate between the two.
  3. Describe the responsibilities of temporary residents including how temporary resident status can be lost and reinstated.
  4. Complete application forms related to Access to Information and Privacy (ATIP) requests; temporary resident visas; student permits; business visitors; work permits (LMIA supported and not LMIA supported – Temporary Foreign Worker and International Mobility Program).
  5. Explore work permits and labour market considerations in Canada and how to navigate and/or use; the National Occupational Classification (NOC) matrix, Labour Market Impact Assessments (LMIA).
  6. Outline the eligibility requirements of the Live-In Caregiver Program and Parent and Grandparent Super Visas.
  7. Explain one’s ability to change terms and conditions, and extensions of temporary status within Canada.

ILAC 07: Permanent Residence (40 hours)

Brief Course Descriptions

This course will provide an overview of the generic requirements of what comprises an application of permanent status. This course will differentiate between the 3 classes of entry: economic, family and humanitarian & compassionate. By looking at all classes of entry, students will have a grasp of the rights and obligations of each individual seeking permanent status. This course will discuss the various decision makers involved in permanent programs and the application process (via online or paper). Students will also get a closer look at the Provincial/Territorial Nominee Agreements and Programs.

Learning Objectives

  1. Compare the different permanent entry classes (family, economic and humanitarian & compassionate considerations).
  2. Discuss the necessary steps for a permanent residency (PR) application.
  3. Outline the responsibilities/requirements/obligations/rights of a permanent resident, and how a permanent resident can lose their status.
  4. Understand and be able to complete application forms related to permanent immigration – permanent resident visa applications and PR card renewals.
  5. Describe how the Economic Class of entry works: the general requirements and the various processing options: Federal Skilled Workers Class, Federal Skilled Trades Class, Canadian Experience Class, Provincial Nominee Program, Business Immigration: Start-Up Business Class, and Self-Employed Persons Class. Reviewing Language Equivalency Charts and measuring settlement funds based on the Low-Income Cut-Off (LICO) and Minimum Necessary Income. Gain an understanding of the process for calculating points for the Federal Skilled Worker Class as relates to the different human capital factors.
  6. Gain an overview of the Provincial/Territorial Nominee Agreements and Programs.
  7. Describe how the Family Class of entry works: eligible family relationships for sponsorship, requirements and obligations of sponsors, the application process and income requirements for gaining permanent residence status.
  8. Describe how the Humanitarian & Compassionate Considerations Class of entry works: Section 25 Criteria – best interests of the child considerations and public policy considerations. The application processes and bars for making a request under the Humanitarian and Compassionate Class. Understand the decisions that can be made on Humanitarian and Compassionate Applications.

ILAC 08: Refugee Law and the Immigration and Refugee Board (40 hours)

Brief Course Descriptions

This course will provide an overview and an understanding regarding the international conventions and government assistance programs processes to protect refugee and protected persons. The course will provide students with an overview of the Refugee and Humanitarian Resettlement Programs. In addition, students will be provided with not only an overview of the Immigration and Refugee Board, but also focus on the Refugee Protection Division and the In-Canada Asylum System.

In this course, students will be expected to explore guides, document checklists, application forms, and supporting documentation related to refugees and protected persons.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify what refugee status is, and the conditions of an individual’s home country under which require displacement.
  2. Distinguish the difference between immigrants and persons in need of protection. Outline the refugee treaties that support refugees internationally. Describe the application forms related to conventions refugees and persons in need of protection.
  3. Explain the Classes of Refugees for Resettlement: Convention Refugee Abroad Class, Humanitarian-Protected Persons Abroad Class, and Country of Asylum Class.
  4. Explain the Special Needs Cases: the Urgent Protection Program and Women at Risk Program.
  5. Discuss financial support programs for refugees – financial resettlement and refugee sponsorships – Government Assisted Refugee Program (GAR), Resettlement Assistance Program (RAP), Groups of Five (G5), Sponsor a Refugee (SAR), Joint Assistance Sponsorship (JAS), Private Sponsorships, Immigration Loans Program (ILP) and Interim Federal Health Program (IFHP).
  6. Discuss the application for permanent residence process and obligations of a private sponsor.
  7. Gain a thorough understanding of the structure, members, tribunal divisions, and tribunal and policy instruments of the Immigration and Refugee Board.
  8. Explain Canada’s Refugee Protection Division and the In-Canada Asylum System (Front-End Stage, Refugee Determination Stage, and Post-Determination Stage).

ILAC 09: Enforcement and Appeals (30 hours)

Brief Course Descriptions

This course will provide an overview of the Immigration Division: Immigration Hearings and Detentions and Immigration and Refugee Appeals- the Immigration Appeal Division and the Refugee Appeal Division. 

This course will look at inadmissibility reports, arrest and detention, admissibility hearings, detention review hearings, and removal orders. 

The course will provide a review of the Immigration Division Rules and the Immigration Appeal Division Rules. 

In addition, the course will also address Judicial Review proceedings for Citizenship Appeals. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss the three different types of removal orders (departure orders, exclusions orders, and deportation orders).
  2. Interpret and complete application forms related to Inadmissibility -Eligibility for Rehabilitation; Authorizations to Return to Canada.
  3. Explain the role of the Immigration Division and explore the Immigration Division rules as related to Immigration Appeal Division proceedings (admissibility hearings, detention reviews, and removal hearings).
  4. Explain the role of the the the Immigration Appeal Division and explore the Immigration Appeal Division rules as related to the Immigration Appeal Division proceedings (sponsorship appeals, removal hearing appeals, residency obligation appeals, and Minister’s appeals).
  5. Explain the role of the Refugee Appeal Division and explore the Refugee Appeal Division rules as related to the Refugee Appeal Division proceedings.
  6. Understand the Judicial Review practices and procedures relating to Citizenship Appeals – including the role of the Federal Court, Application for Leave and for Judicial Review; Judicial Review Hearings; Decisions on Application of Judicial Review; and the Supreme Court of Canada.

ILAC 10: Citizenship and Legal Professionals (30 hours)

Brief Course Descriptions

This course will provide an overview of the process of citizenship acquisition in Canada. Students will review the Canadian Citizenship Act and become familiar with the Citizenship Commission. Throughout the course, students will gain an appreciation for the necessary steps to granting citizenship, and all the accompanying fees, forms and documents. This course will also look at the processes of restoring, renouncing, revoking and resuming citizenship.  

This course will also provide an overview regarding Legal Professionals in relation to the legal parameters of practice for Immigration Legal Assistants with Authorized Representatives and what constitutes Unauthorized Representative practice.  In addition, the course will review examples of Codes of Professional Conduct from regulatory bodies and outline Immigration Legal Assistants’ ethical and fiduciary responsibilities. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe what the Canadian Citizenship Act is, and what it entails. Recognize significant amendments to the Canadian Citizenship Act.  
  2. Outline the roles and responsibilities of the Citizenship Commission.  
  3. Express how citizenship is ultimately obtained.  
  4. Explain the attributes of citizenship in Canada (right to enter and remain, multiple citizenships, rights and responsibilities of Canadian citizenship).  
  5. Explain the grant of Canadian citizenship process and all supporting fees and documents.
  6. Outline who a prohibited person is, what the citizenship test consists of and the citizenship oath.  
  7. Interpret and complete application forms related to grant of citizenship, restoring and resuming citizenship, and renouncing and revoking citizenship.
  8. Outline the legal parameters of practice and responsibilities of Immigration Legal Assistants and understand the difference between Authorized Practitioners and Unauthorized Representation.
  9. Understand the regulatory processes in place for Authorized Practitioners and the importance of meeting one’s ethical and fiduciary responsibilities.
  10. Review Codes of Professional Conduct that would be applicable for Immigration Legal Assistants. 

Faculty*

Adeela Alvez

Adeela has absolute passion for the legal field, which she exhibits through her dedications and contributions towards the field. Her approach to the practice is client centered. She recognizes that a successful legal representative requires a satisfied client, who trusts that work will be undertaken by the representative in a professional manner and completed in an efficient fashion.

 

Jane Desmond

Jane Desmond has been an immigration consultant and instructor for sixteen years. Jane has built a solid reputation amongst her peers. Her experience, coupled with her work in the community, have afforded her extensive legal exposure and understanding. Furthermore, her in-depth knowledge and insight have been sought by television networks – OMNI News, Globo (the largest television network in Brazil), and various local ethnic media outlets – to explain the implications of the changes in government policies and regulations in immigration.

 

Hjalmar Leon

Hjalmar (LLB, MBA, RCIC) received his Bachelor of Laws Degree from University of Los Andes in South America and later completed his Master of Business Administration in Global Management from the University of Phoenix. He received his Professional Specialization in Public Sector Management from the University of Victoria, and he is a graduate of the Ashton College Immigration Consultant Diploma program.

 

Divino Rex Ramos

Divino Rex Ramos is a Regulated Canadian Immigration Consultant with over five years of industry experience. He has worked at JBS as an Employment Manager in Alberta, where he ran the Recruitment Department and the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. He has also lived in Ontario where he pursued his degree in International Relations, while working as a Human Resources Manager and Senior Immigration Advisor at DVN.

 

Cristie Lane Tayde

Cristie Lane Tayde attained her Bachelor’s degree and Certificate in Immigration from the University of British Columbia. She has been a Regulated Canada Immigration Consultant with BC Happy Homes Immigration Services since 2009. Though their company caters for clients from across the globe, they have several offices set up in the Philippines, where Cristie often goes to conduct seminars and provide consultation services.

 

*Subject to change without notice

Admission Requirements

General Admission Requirements for Domestic Students

Are you a domestic student?

You must prove the following:

  • You have successfully completed a B.C. Secondary School diploma or the equivalent of one
  • You are at least 19 years old before the first day of your program or you have parental or guardian consent

English Language Proficiency Requirements for Domestic Students

Are you a domestic student?

You must show your language proficiency in ONE of the following ways:

  • You achieved a C+ (67%) or higher in BC English Studies 12, English First Peoples 12 or Literary Studies 12 or an equivalent course in Canada
  • You have completed two or more years in a row of full-time post-secondary education in English in one of the approved countries listed below OR you have completed three or more years in a row of full-time secondary school education in English in one of the approved countries listed below
  • You achieved a minimum score on one of the approved tests listed below

Approved Countries

American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malta, Mauritius, Montserrat, New Zealand, Nigeria, Seychelles, Sierre Leone, Singapore, South Africa, St Helena, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & The Grenadines, Tanzania, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States of America, US Virgin Islands, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Approved English Language Proficiency Tests and Scores

  • Cambridge English Advanced (CAE): minimum score of 58 or C
  • The Canadian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL): minimum score of 55
  • Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP): General 6
  • Duolingo: minimum score of 110 (temporary due to COVID)
  • International English Language Testing (IELTS): academic level with a minimum overall score of 6.0
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) internet-based test: academic level with a minimum score of 79-80 and a minimum of 19-20 on each band
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) paper-based test: minimum score of 550 and a minimum of 23 each for reading, writing, and listening

General Admission Requirements for International Students

Are you an international student?

You must prove the following:

  • You have successfully completed a B.C. Secondary School diploma or the equivalent of one
  • You are at least 19 years old before the first day of your program

English Language Proficiency Requirements for International Students

Are you an international student?

You must show your language proficiency in ONE of the following ways:

  • You achieved a C+ (67%) or higher in BC English Studies 12, English First Peoples 12 or Literary Studies 12 or an equivalent course in Canada
  • You have completed two or more years in a row of full-time post-secondary education in English in one of the approved countries listed below OR you have completed three or more years in a row of full-time secondary school education in English in one of the approved countries listed below
  • You achieved a minimum score on one of the approved tests listed below

Approved Countries

American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malta, Mauritius, Montserrat, New Zealand, Nigeria, Seychelles, Sierre Leone, Singapore, South Africa, St Helena, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent & The Grenadines, Tanzania, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States of America, US Virgin Islands, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Approved English Language Proficiency Tests and Scores

  • Cambridge English Advanced (CAE): minimum score of 58 or C
  • The Canadian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL): minimum score of 55
  • Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP): General 6
  • Duolingo: minimum score of 110 (temporary due to COVID)
  • International English Language Testing (IELTS): academic level with a minimum overall score of 6.0
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) internet-based test: academic level with a minimum score of 79-80 and a minimum of 19-20 on each band
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) paper-based test: minimum score of 550 and a minimum of 23 each for reading, writing, and listening

General Admission Requirements for Mature Students

Do you identify as a mature student?

To qualify, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You are at least 19 years of age
  • You have not completed a B.C. Secondary School diploma or the equivalent of one

Application Requirements

Mature Students must submit ALL of the following:

  • At least one letter of reference from a person who is not related to you
  • A statement of intent clearly outlining your career goals and your reasons for believing you will succeed in the program
  • A personal profile of 250 words or less

Additional Requirements

You must meet all of the program-specific and non-academic requirements where listed. In some cases, you may need to complete a placement exam to determine academic readiness.

 

Additional Requirements for All Students

Applicants should have previous experience with MS office

Dates

Live Online

Full Time:

  • July 11, 2022 – November 04, 2022
    • Webinars will be held Monday to Friday from 5:30 to 7:30 pm PST
    • Students must devote at least 20 hours per week to attending webinars, seminars, and laboratories online
    • Seminars and laboratory times are decided at the start of the cohort

In-Class

Full Time:

  • September 12, 2022 – January 07, 2023
    • Classes will be held Monday to Friday from 5:00 to 9:00 pm PST
    • Seminars and laboratory times are decided at the start of the cohort

Fees

Tuition fees for this program are due and payable 2 weeks prior to the cohort start date. Students with guaranteed funding arrangements will be exempt from this requirement provided they produce proof of funding before the cohort start date.

All formats of the program are eligible for Canada Student Loans, other forms of government funding, and bank financing. However, students are responsible for making their own funding arrangements and are advised to contact the relevant funder well in advance of the start date to make an application.

Application and tuition fees for this program are as follows:

  • Application fee: $40 (Domestic Students) or $140 (International Students)
  • Tuition fee (Domestic): $5,200
  • Tuition fee (International): $6,500

If your enrolment is complete by June 30, 2022, you will qualify for the Summer Rebate of $500.00 off the above tuition fees.

Note: Tuition fees do not include the cost of required textbooks. Approximate textbook fees are $250.

Technical Requirements

Live Online Students

Ashton College uses web conferencing tools to help instructors and students connect and collaborate live online. For the online classes, students need to have a fully functional computer system with a webcam, speakers and microphone or headset and headphones, along with a reliable high-speed internet connection. Though the classes can be accessed using smartphones and tablets, we recommend using a laptop or desktop computer for a better learning experience.

This program was reviewed and approved by the Registrar of the Private Training Institutions Branch of the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

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