Developmental Services Worker Diploma (Live Online and In-Class)

  • Format:

    Live Online and In-Class

  • Duration:

    680 hours

  • Application Fee:

    $200 (Domestic)
    $300 (International)

  • Tuition Fee:

    $6,730 (Domestic)
    $8,412 (International)

Start Date

Live Online live-logo

Full Time: May 02, 2022 – January 10, 2023

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In-Class

Full Time: May 02, 2022 – January 10, 2023

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Developmental Services Worker Program: Program Overview

The Developmental Services Worker (DSW) Diploma program focuses on the skills necessary to assist clients with their physical, vocational, recreational, social, emotional and daily skill development. ​It is perfectly suited for anyone who wants to become a Personal Support Worker, Home Support Worker or Development Service Worker.

Developmental Services Worker​/Personal Support Worker students will learn how to ​provide personal support ​to clients ​enabling them to ​achieve the highest degree of independence and quality of life possible. ​Typically the Community Support Worker or Personal Support Worker will offer a variety of services depending upon the needs of the specific case.

Apart from learning about behaviour management and counselling, you will also receive training in crisis intervention, learning and support strategies, creating community inclusivity, health and wellness, communication skills and more. As a Developmental Services Worker​/personal support worker, you ​may ​also ​be called upon to help support individuals with developmental disabilities, social and personal problems, and ensure their overall well-being.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this program the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Ask critical questions to gain meaningful knowledge about how to support someone with a specific disability
  • Understand the needs and issues specific to the most prevalent disabilities, such as intellectual disabilities, autism, psychiatric, conduct, behavioural, hearing and vision impairments and major physical disabilities
  • Support and adapt strategies for the above-mentioned disabilities
  • Carry out research to gain knowledge
  • Conduct comprehensive research into a specific disability to develop expertise
  • Analyze cases related to disabilities using collaborative and cooperative problem-solving strategies
  • Develop and make an effective presentation to the community on a disability
  • Recognize the importance of the individuality of a person who has a disability
  • Appreciate the complex relationship between the disability and the whole person
  • Develop awareness of how our own perceptions affect our understanding of disabilities

Career Opportunities

Graduates of the Developmental Services Worker program will be able to obtain positions within the following fields:

  • Child and youth programs
  • Public schools
  • Rehabilitation/detoxification centres
  • Integrated child care
  • Respite care
  • After-school leisure and life skills programs
  • Supported work and employment programs
  • Residential group homes
  • Community living agencies
  • Outreach programs
  • Women’s shelters
  • Private in-home care agencies

Course Descriptions

DSW 100: Introduction to Online Learning (5 hours)

This course is intended to provide students with the fundamental skills to be successful in an online learning environment. Students will be introduced to the Microsoft Office suite applications most commonly used in document preparation and report writing. Students will also learn how to effectively implement Internet web searches. Students will learn the applications of their learning management system (LMS), in order to upload assignments and access content throughout their time in the program.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Navigate and use Microsoft Office Suite to create and edit reports
  • Create and manage files and folders
  • Explore the features and functions of Zoom
  • Use web browsers to explore the Internet and perform effective searches
  • Upload documents to the LMS
  • Summarize the need for APA formatting, and identify sources used in correct APA format
  • Demonstrate the core elements of presentation, using fundamental presentation skills
  • Outline collaboration skills need for working in groups in an online setting
  • Demonstrate an ability to write at the college level

DSW 101: Introduction to Developmental Disabilities (30 hours)

This course will discuss developmental disabilities such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Disorder (FASD), Down Syndrome (or Trisomy 21), Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS), and Fragile-X Syndrome (FXS). The focus of this course is evidence-based research on these disorders and commonly used interventions that have demonstrated enhancements in independence and quality of life. This course will provide an overview of the care and considerations needed when working with individuals with disabilities. This course is an overview of the historical outlook on disability as well the recent research surrounding disabilities. Students will learn the importance of confidentiality and protecting vulnerable populations. This course will also cover the attitudes, perceptions and stigmatizing towards individuals with disabilities.

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Define disability
  • Explain Autism Spectrum Disorder, characteristics and interventions
  • Explain Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, characteristics and interventions
  • Explain Down Syndrome, the characteristics and interventions
  • Explain Prader-Willi Syndrome, the characteristics and interventions
  • Explain Fragile-X Syndrome, the characteristics and interventions
  • Explain the perception of disability from a historical context
  • Identify some of the new and emerging research in disability that is being done
  • Define stigma. Outline the ways stigma is perpetuated and how a community goes about breaking it down
  • Define inclusion. Outline the challenges of inclusion and recent arguments for and against inclusion
  • Describe the best ways to support an individual with a developmental disability
  • Outline ways to adapt and modify community programs to suit the specific needs of an individual
  • Explain the critical issues that individuals with developmental disabilities face in society
  • Outline a framework for supporting inclusivity within a community setting
  • Define vulnerable population. Outline the reasons for enhanced protection of individuals with disabilities

DSW 102: The Roles and Responsibilities of the Community Support Worker (30 hours)

In this course, students will look at the roles and responsibilities of a Developmental Services Worker. Students will gain an understanding of, and exposure to, a variety of potential work environments. Students will also learn their professional code of conduct and ethics as a Developmental Services Worker. This course introduces students to the core values of the industry as well as a Developmental Service Worker’s role in advocacy and empowerment of individuals with disabilities. Students will also explore confidentiality and professional boundaries to set them up for success in their future roles.

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Outline the different settings Developmental Services Workers can work, and the scope of their role
  • Explain the history of Developmental Services Workers in Canada
  • Discuss the professional nature of Developmental Services work and outline a variety of common roles that will be performed
  • Describe and analyze the problem-solving process in Developmental Services work and identify its contributions and limitations
  • Explain how the strengths approach is fundamental to Developmental Services practice
  •  Identify the importance of cultural agility when working with individuals from diverse backgrounds in the community
  •  Explain the ethical requirements of working with individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Demonstrate an ability to act professionally as it pertains to a role in the developmental services sector
  • Identify the code of conduct and core values of the Developmental Services industry: service, social justice, empowerment, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity and competence
  • Explain the helping relationship
  • Identify the importance of confidentiality in Developmental Services work
  • Identify the need for professional boundaries and limits in the role of a Developmental Services worker

DSW 103: Life Span Stages and Development (60 hours)

Students will gain an understanding of theorists and their research on life span development. Exploration of development will begin with infancy and early childhood and end with late adulthood and the end of life. Students will also have the opportunity to make decisions in raising a child from infancy to adulthood through a virtual reality assignment. Additionally, this course will touch on how developmental disabilities alter development through the life span. Students will gain an appreciation for how developmental disabilities contribute to everyday life from infancy to late adulthood.

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Explain how the science of developmental psychology came into being
  • Explain the key contemporary theories and concepts that influence and guide our current understanding and study of developmental psychology
  • List and explain the research designs and methods used by developmentalists and describe the ethical standards researchers must follow when conducting research
  • Explain how human development is rooted in biological processes that have evolved to promote adaptation and survival
  • Explain how developmental change happens because of the interplay of internal drives and emotions with our early life experiences
  • Explain how human behaviour is seen and shaped by processes such as classical conditioning and operant conditioning
  • List and describe several problems in prenatal development
  • Describe developmental milestones in early childhood
  • Using a diagram, trace the development of the brain and the nervous system during the first two years
  • Describe the many changes that occur in infant’s bodies, and how their health can be maintained
  • Describe the development of muscles, bones, lungs, and the heart, and their impact on motor skills during infancy
  • Identify the health issues of infants. Outline causes and risk factors for developmental delays
  • Summarize the cognitive changes in preschoolers
  • Discuss the changes in language development in young children
  • Describe how delays in development have long term impacts on child development
  • Discuss the differences between the theories of social and personality development
  • Explain the theories of social and personality development in late adulthood
  • Examine the individual differences that impact successful aging
  • Examine developmental disabilities through the lifespan from infancy to late adulthood and the spectrum of living and working arrangements

DSW 104: Introduction to Psychology and Abnormal Psychology (60 hours)

This course outlines the fundamentals in psychology and abnormal psychology. Students will learn the factual foundation, techniques, vocabulary of psychology and human behaviour. Application of psychology in areas of learning, intelligence, motivation, emotion, personality, behaviour disorders, mental health and therapy will be discussed. By understanding abnormal psychology, students are better equipped to make connections and build relationships with the individuals they are supporting within the community.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Define psychology and differentiate between normal and abnormal psychology
  • Attain a working understanding of some of the major theories in psychology
  • Develop one’s skills in critical thinking
  • Demonstrate a fundamental understanding of various psychological disorders
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the treatments and therapies used for various psychological disorders
  • Consider the implication of labelling something as abnormal
  • Identify the symptoms, etiology and contributing factors (lifestyle, behaviour, social interactions, emotions and cognition) to psychological disorder
  • Explore the tendencies of psychological comorbidity
  • Demonstrate knowledge of common terminology used in psychology and abnormal psychology and outline the main features of abnormal psychological concepts

DSW 105: Introduction to Mental Health & Promoting Wellness (90 hours)

In this course, students will receive an overview of mental health service delivery options within BC and how to determine service delivery options within your specific area. Students will also explore Canada’s Mental Health Act. Students will be introduced to the DSM-V, etiology, symptoms and treatments of various major mental illnesses and disorders. This course will also touch on the role of health and wellness in the lives of community members, and how to help promote healthy habits in the individuals you are supporting. Due to the fact that the Developmental Services Worker (DSW) is supporting and providing care to individuals with complex medical needs, it is important to have a basic understanding of bodily functions. Students will also get a glimpse into the mind-body connection.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Explain the mental health service delivery in BC and the steps needed to find mental health services within different jurisdictions
  • Discuss Canada’s Mental Health Act
  • Know how to read and understand the DSM-V
  • Explain the etiology, symptoms and treatment of various major mental illnesses and disorders
  • Discuss the role of psychiatric medications
  • Explain the role of developmental services workers in ongoing medication monitoring and support
  • Explain the role of health promotion in developmental services work
  • Outline ways in which individuals with mental health disorders, physical disabilities and developmental disabilities can prevent illness and enhance their wellness
  • Outline the different body systems and the additional health challenges associated with complex disabilities
  • Explain the mind-body connection and how to support individuals with their attitudes and perceptions in order to enhance their overall wellbeing

DSW 106: Principles of Behaviour Management (90 hours)

This course focuses on the industry best practice of behaviour management which is Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) and under the umbrella of ABA is Positive Behaviour Support which students will also become familiar with. Using the ABC model (modifying antecedents and consequences), students will understand how to manage behaviour using reinforcement. There are many ethical considerations to keep in mind regarding behaviour management, so students will get a deeper look into providing behaviour support that is client-centered and supports an enhanced quality of life. Practical applications of theory and their effects on behaviours will be discussed through this course.

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Describe the basic theory behind applied behaviour analysis
  • Discuss why there is concern about its use
  • Use the ABC model to differentiate between the antecedent, behaviour and consequence
  • Identify a target behaviour for modification
  • List and describe behavioural assessments, graphing and data analysis
  • Describe the options to increase or decrease the frequency of behaviour
  • Explain how to establish discriminations
  • Explain how to teach generalization and set up maintenance schedules
  • Develop an individual behaviour support plan

DSW 107: Alternative and Augmentative Communication & Assistive Technologies (30 hours)

There is an expanse of technologies available to help adapt the built environment to support the needs of individuals with various disabilities. This course is designed to show how assistive technology can be used in community settings to enhance the teaching and learning of people with disabilities. It addresses the challenge of how we can effectively use assistive technology in all kinds of settings to enhance skill-building. This course will also discuss alternate communication technologies and give students the foundational skills to use these technologies, in order to communicate effectively with the individuals they are supporting.

Upon completion of this course, the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Define Assistive Technology (AT)
  • Explain what AT is and the differences between assistive, adaptive and rehabilitative devices are
  • Discuss the most commonly used types of AT
  • Discuss the history of AT and how far technology has come in supporting individuals with disabilities
  • Explain and apply the SETT Framework
  • Discuss and give examples of AT to enhance mobility for persons with physical impairments
  • Discuss challenges an individual with a physical impairment may experience in various community settings with limited accessibility
  • Discuss ways to mitigate accessibility challenges in the community
  • Define Alternate and Augmentative Communication (AAC)
  • Discuss various tools used in AAC to communicate using low-tech, mid-tech and high-tech
  • Identify examples of aided and unaided communication devices
  • Explain and give examples of AT and AAC to enhance independent living

DSW 108: Dual Diagnosis (60 hours)

A dual diagnosis is defined by a combination of two diagnoses, in this course the focus will be the interaction between a developmental disability diagnosis and a mental illness diagnosis. Students will get a better look at the history of dual diagnosis and how a mental illness can make a developmental disability more complex. This course will also outline the importance of a support team and all of the practitioners and service providers involved in supporting an individual with a dual diagnosis.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Define dual diagnosis
  • Identify the ways in which having an existing developmental disability can confound a mental illness
  • Discuss mental disorders in both clinical and research settings
  • Explain dual diagnosis and what it means to the client
  • Discuss different treatment options available
  • Explain what a multidisciplinary support team is and who it is comprised of
  • Outline the roles of various service providers and practitioners on a multidisciplinary support team

DSW 109: Fundamentals of Pharmacology and Medication Support (30 hours)

This course introduces drug therapy and the administration of medication responsibilities of a developmental services worker. Students will learn the basics about drug interactions and the various uses of medications and how they target the different body systems based on the disease or disorder. Students will also get an overview of supporting individuals in the community with addiction disorders.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Explain what drug therapy is and the different classes of drugs
  • Explain the cruciality of administering medication correctly
  • Identify the ethical considerations in remaining confidential and safe as it pertains to medication administration
  • Identify how to respond to an emergency in the event of incorrect administration or overdose
  • Explain the basic ways in which medication is used to treat disorder or disease in the various body systems
  • Identify common drug interactions with other drugs and foods and how to identify an adverse drug reaction
  • Explore how to support individuals in the community living with addiction disorders

DSW 110: Supporting Independence of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) (30 hours)

This course will teach students how to employ strategies to motivate, support and encourage clients in Activities of Daily Living and Life Skills.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Define Activities of Daily Living (ADLs)
  • Define Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADLs)
  • Discuss the importance of fostering independence
  • Apply support plans to assist clients to be more independent
  • Understand functional assessments and how to use them

DSW 111: Person-Centered Planning (30 hours)

The concept of person-centered planning looks at the process by which the interests and desires of an individual with a disability are central to making joint decisions about the future. Living and working considerations vary depending on each individual and that is why it is crucial to ensure the person is central. This course will teach students how to assist people to enhance participation in their communities based on their interests.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Define person centered planning
  • Explain how to increase the presence of a person in their community
  • Discuss how to expand and deepen people’s friendships
  • Explain how to assist clients to have more control and choice
  • Identify ways to increase participation in the community
  • Explain how to develop their competencies and contributions of their unique gifts
  • Explore PATHS, MAPS and Circles of Support

DSW 112: Career Planning and Preparation (15 hours)

This course will provide graduates with the skills necessary to prepare for, seek and secure employment in their field of study. Students will get a clear understanding of what their options are for employment opportunities and the different settings they could apply to work in. Students will learn how to format their resumes and cover letters as well as how to conduct oneself in an interview. By building on career planning skills, students are better equipped to also support their clients in attaining employment.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

  • Identify and select potential employment opportunities
  • Prepare a professional and effective cover letter and resume Demonstrate how to give constructive feedback to peers Demonstrate role appropriate interview skills
  • Self-reflect and identify continuous opportunities for growth and development

DSW 113: Field Practicum (120 hours)

This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply their knowledge to a community setting. Through completing a field practicum, students are prepared for a career in developmental services. Students will have hands-on experience supporting individuals with disabilities in the community and will apply what they have learned about professionalism and relationship building to practices within the developmental services field.

Upon completion of this course the successful student will have reliably demonstrated the ability to:

Be respectful and kind to clients.

  • Adhere to confidentiality
  • Demonstrate professionalism in their role as a DSW
  • Assist clients to become more independent
  • Build relationships with the clients they are supporting
  • Work within a multidisciplinary team to benefit clients
  • Ask questions and be curious about their role and responsibilities

Admission Requirements

General Admission Requirements for Domestic Students

Are you a domestic student?

You must prove the following:

  • You have successfully earned a high school diploma or Adult Graduation Diploma
  • You are at least 19 years old before the first day of your program or you have parental or guardian consent

English Language Proficiency Requirements for Domestic Students

Are you a domestic student?

You must show your language proficiency in ONE of the following ways:

  • You achieved 70% or higher in Canadian provincial or territorial English 12, English Literature 12 or an equivalent course
  • You have completed two or more years in a row of full-time post-secondary education in English in one of the approved countries listed below
  • You achieved a minimum score on one of the approved tests listed below

Approved Countries

Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Virgin Islands, Canada, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malta, Mauritius, Montserrat, New Zealand, Nigeria, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and The Grenadines, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, Zimbabwe 

Approved English Language Proficiency Tests and Scores

  • Cambridge English Advanced (CAE): minimum score of 58
  • The Canadian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL): minimum score of 60
  • Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP): academic level 4L and CELPIP-General level 7 in all components
  • Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB): minimum score of 7
  • International English Language Testing (IELTS): academic level with a minimum overall score of 6.0
  • International Test of English Proficiency (iTEP): academic level 3
  • Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency (MELAB): minimum score of 76
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) internet-based test: academic level with a minimum score of 79-80 and a minimum of 19-20 on each band
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) paper-based test: minimum score of 550 and a minimum of 23 each for reading, writing, and listening
  • Duolingo: minimum score of 110 (temporary option available until December 2021)

General Admission Requirements for International Students

Are you an international student?

You must prove the following:

  • You have successfully earned a high school diploma or Adult Graduation Diploma
  • You are at least 19 years old before the first day of your program or you have parental or guardian consent

English Language Proficiency Requirements for International Students

Are you an international student?

You must show your language proficiency in ONE of the following ways:

  • You achieved 70% or higher in Canadian provincial or territorial English 12, English Literature 12 or an equivalent course
  • You have completed two or more years in a row of full-time post-secondary education in English in one of the approved countries listed below
  • You achieved a minimum score on one of the approved tests listed below

Approved Countries

Antigua and Barbuda, Australia, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Grenada, Guam, Guyana, Ireland, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malta, Mauritius, Montserrat, New Zealand, Nigeria, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, South Africa, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and The Grenadines, Tanzania, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, Uganda, United Kingdom, United States of America, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Approved English Language Proficiency Tests and Scores

  • Cambridge English Advanced (CAE): minimum score of 58
  • The Canadian Academic English Language Assessment (CAEL): minimum score of 60
  • Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP): academic level 4L and CELPIP-General level 7 in all components
  • Canadian Language Benchmarks (CLB): minimum score of 7
  • International English Language Testing (IELTS): academic level with a minimum overall score of 6.0
  • International Test of English Proficiency (iTEP): academic level 3
  • Michigan Test of English Language Proficiency (MELAB): minimum score of 76
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) internet-based test: academic level with a minimum score of 79-80 and a minimum of 19-20 on each band
  • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) paper-based test: minimum score of 550 and a minimum of 23 each for reading, writing, and listening
  • Duolingo: minimum score of 110 (temporary option available until December 2021)

General Admission Requirements for Mature Students

Do you identify as a mature student?

To qualify, you must meet the following requirements:

  • You are at least 21 years of age
  • You have not completed a high school diploma or an Adult Graduation Diploma or you have not attended high school in the last four years and you have not earned a degree or diploma for a college or university

Application Requirements

Mature Students are accepted at the discretion of the Registrar, who may require you to submit the following:

  • Transcripts of completed high school or post-secondary education
  • 1 or 2 professional references from your current or past employers
  • A written letter outlining your career goals and why you feel you will succeed in the program
  • A written personal profile
  • Other forms of documentation to support your application

Additional Requirements

You must meet all of the program-specific and non-academic requirements where listed. In some cases, you may need to complete a placement exam to determine academic readiness.

 

Additional Requirements for All Students

Applicants should also provide the following additional documents. These additional mandatory requirements apply prior to commencing practicums and not at the time of admission.

  1. Clear criminal records search for the vulnerable sector.
  2. TB test and/or X-ray and Certificate of Health.

Dates

Live Online

Full Time:

  • May 02, 2022 – January 10, 2023
    • Webinars are held Monday to Friday from 8:30 am – 12:30 pm  PST
    • Students must devote at least 15 hours per week to attending webinars, seminars, and laboratories online
    • Seminars and laboratory times are decided at the start of the cohort

In-Class:

  • May 02, 2022 – January 10, 2023
    • Sessions are held Monday to Friday from 8:30 am – 12:30 pm  PST
    • Students must devote at least 15 hours per week to attending webinars, seminars, and laboratories online
    • Seminars and laboratory times are decided at the start of the cohort

Fees

Tuition fees for this program are due and payable 2 weeks prior to the cohort start date. Students with guaranteed funding arrangements will be exempt from this requirement provided they produce proof of funding before the cohort start date.

All formats of the program are eligible for Canada Student Loans, other forms of government funding, and bank financing. However, students are responsible for making their own funding arrangements and are advised to contact the relevant funder well in advance of the start date to make an application.

Application and tuition fees for this program are as follows:

  • Application fee: $200 (Domestic Students) or $300 (International Students)
  • Tuition fee (Domestic): $6,730
  • Tuition fee (International): $8,412

Note: Tuition fees do not include the cost of the required textbooks. The approximate textbook fees are $1,135.

Technical Requirements

Live Online Students

Ashton College uses web conferencing tools to help instructors and students connect and collaborate live online. For the online classes, students need to have a fully functional computer system with a webcam, speakers and microphone or headset and headphones, along with a reliable high-speed internet connection. Though the classes can be accessed using smartphones and tablets, we recommend using a laptop or desktop computer for a better learning experience.

This program was reviewed and approved by the Registrar of the Private Training Institutions Branch of the Ministry of Advanced Education and Skills Training.

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